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Health

Dr. Robert Carney and Dr. David Hector, board-certified cardiologists at Tyler Cardiovascular Consultants (CVC), have returned to Henderson to provide cardiology related services to the community in conjunction with the UT Health East Texas Heart and Vascular Institute.

 

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Having high blood sugar over months and years can damage your blood vessels and nerves, leading to heart disease, kidney disease, eye disease and foot problems. Another complication of diabetes - which affects about 50 percent of men with diabetes - is impotence. Physical, hormonal and emotional factors contribute to impotence, also called erectile dysfunction.

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In August 2020, Meagan Doran got the news that no one wants to hear, “You have cancer.” Meagan was only 36 years old and a mother of two young children. She had a significant family history of cancer, so she knew there was a chance she could experience it one day, but hearing those words is something you can never prepare for.

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When a person is experiencing a stroke, receiving the best care quickly is essential in preventing lasting damage and providing the best chance for recovery. UT Health Tyler is designated a comprehensive stroke center by The Joint Commission. That means we offer the highest level of stroke care available, and we are able to treat the most complex stroke cases.

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When thinking of a transformation, we think of something being changed until it is no longer the same. In order to achieve your best heart health, your lifestyle must transform. Often, this includes changing how active you are, what you eat, and how you cope with stress. It may seem overwhelming at first, but UT Health East Texas cardiac rehabilitation is here to help you along the way.

 

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What is cardiac rehabilitation?
Cardiac rehabilitation is a medically supervised and individualized program designed to improve cardiovascular health in those who’ve experienced a heart attack, heart failure and angioplasty or heart surgery.

The program consists of 36, one-hour sessions that span about three months. During that time, we have the privilege of knowing our...

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Stroke remains the leading cause of death among all Americans, with more than 795,000 people in the United States experiencing a stroke annually. Many risk factors of stroke can be treated, modified or controlled; however, some cannot.

These are called controllable vs. uncontrollable risk factors:

Controllable Risk Factors

  • High blood pressure
  • Smoking
  • Heart disease
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Preventive care consists of measures taken for disease prevention. It is the most important step you can take to manage your health. Many of the highest risk factors leading to illness and early death are preventable. Examples of preventive healthcare include cancer screening, vaccinations, healthy eating and not smoking.

The opportunity to be healthy is not afforded to everyone, especially in communities of color, where chronic diseases occur at higher rates and severity. Language barriers, lack of insurance...

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Every nine seconds, someone in the United States sustains a brain injury, and according to the Brain Injury Association of America, one in every 60 Americans is living with the long-term effects of brain injury. After a brain injury, patients may experience cognitive, psychological and physical deficits that have a profound effect on their day-to-day life. Access to quality rehabilitative care after brain injury is crucial. Rehabilitation removes as many barriers as possible between the individual and their recovery goals, including maintaining their independence,...

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As a result of new information regarding the relationship between the cardiovascular system and COVID-19, there’s been a lot of chatter around the question of should you consider a heart scan after recovering? Answers vary depending on the individual and the severity of their stint with the virus.

If you had a mild case, or you were asymptomatic, experts do not believe it’s necessary to get a heart scan before resuming activity. However, for individuals who had a severe case of COVID-19, or for those who were hospitalized with the virus, it’s advised that you do not return to...

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